Church


St Mary's Church History

Black Bourton had its own church by the mid 12th century, apparently jointly established by the lords of two Black Bourton manors. From the 13th century it was an independent vicarage, though the former minster church at Bampton retained burial rights until the 1580s. The benefice's relative poverty ensured that the church was served usually by obscure resident vicars; many seem to have been conscientious, though there were periods of relative neglect particularly in the 16th and 18th centuries, reversed in the 19th by the dynamic attentions of the long-serving vicar James Lupton. Some of the Hungerford family, resident lords of Bourton Winslow and Bourton Inge manors, were Roman Catholic recusants in the late 16th and 18th centuries, but seem to have had little influence, and Protestant Nonconformity, too, remained minimal until the early 19th century, when a Primitive Methodist chapel was established despite opposition from the vicar. The chapel continued until the later 20th century.

From: 'Black Bourton: Religious history', A History of the County of Oxford: Volume 15: Bampton Hundred (Part Three) (2006), pp. 94-99.

In 1963 the ecclesiastical parish was divided, the northern part, including Carterton, being united with Brize Norton. The southern part, including Black Bourton village and church, was merged with Alvescot and Shilton to form a new united benefice, to which Holwell and Westwell were added in 1979. In 1995 all those places became part of the large united benefice of Shill Valley and Broadshire. (fn. 8)

From: 'Black Bourton: Religious history', A History of the County of Oxford: Volume 15: Bampton Hundred (Part Three) (2006), pp. 94-99. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=117007 Date accessed: 01 October 2012.

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